Motherblog Central Directives

Terror and Triumph in the Thirties

Long Live Soviet Physical Culture! (1934)

If the Soviet thirties were the worst of times for many, for others they were among the best.  The posts this week reflected that dichotomy, and one of the main themes that comes from looking at all of the submissions is the amazing juxtaposition of achievement and success (building the Metro, mass marketing “champagne,” investing in a “happy childhood,” cultivating enthusiasm for physical fitness) against the trauma and tragedy of the Purges and the Stalinist dictatorship. We had a bumper crop of good posts this week, and the editorial team is delighted to bring back the weekly digest. Besides the wonderful posts featured in the slider, make sure to check out Comrades’ Corner, which has never been so crowded.  Finally, a warm congratulations to the student choice winner and finalists.

And now, full steam ahead.  The Great Patriotic war awaits!

 

Sixth Blogpost Guidelines

Irakli Toidze: (1943) Another in the Toidze series of recruiting posters. Source: Natalia Vorontsova-Iur eva: Live Journal

Irakli Toidze: (1943) Another in the Toidze series of recruiting posters.
Source: Natalia Vorontsova-Iur eva: Live Journal

This week we turn our attention to The Great Patriotic War (aka World War II) and the immediate post-war period.  Please use one of the modules from 1943 or 1947 in Seventeen Moments in Soviet History on-line archive. You may also use the module on Soviet Territorial Annexations from 1939.  You should consult  Ch. 12 in the Freeze text. If you are writing about something specific to the war, it would be worth considering William C. Fuller’s discussion on pp. 383-392 of Freeze about the reasons for Soviet victory. You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post.  There’s plenty of action, drama, and complexity to keep us all engaged this week.  Не шага назад!

Fifth Blogpost Guidelines

Yurii Pimenov: Everybody to the Competition! (1928)

Yurii Pimenov: Everybody to the Competition! (1928)

Welcome back to the Motherblog!  The thirties await our attention and as good Rockin’ Shockworkers, we will bring our best, most enthusiastic and most astute energies to the task at hand. No “False Shockworkers” in our collective!

For this week’s post, please choose a topic from the 1934, 1936 or 1939 section of Seventeen Moments of Soviet History and use it to examine the political, social, economic and cultural dynamics of the Soviet thirties.  (Please save the module on “Territorial Annexations” for next week, as it is directly connected to World War II.) You should also consult second part of Ch. 11 (pp. 358-373) in the Freeze text. You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post.

From Civil War to the Roaring 20s

Dmitrii Moore, "Comrade Muslims" (1919)

“Better fewer, but better,” Lenin once said, referring to the challenges of cultivating quality recruits into the Party and state apparatus after the Civil War. For this week’s digest we received fewer submissions, but many that were exemplary. The transition from Lenin’s leadership to Stalin’s rule and the Bolsheviks’ assault on the Orthodox church proved…

From World War I to Revolution: 1917

Women Workers - Pick Up A Rifle!

What an eventful week for high value contributions to the Motherblog! This edition is chock-full of posts analyzing key developments from Russia’s entry into World War I, to the revolutions of 1917, and the social cataclysm that ensued. While many people focused on military or political issues, there were also some terrific posts on the…

Fourth Blogpost Guidelines

"Artwork by El Lissitzky 1919". Via Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Artwork_by_El_Lissitzky_1919.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Artwork_by_El_Lissitzky_1919.jpg

Beat the Whites with a Red Wedge “Artwork by El Lissitzky 1919“. Via Wikipedia.

For your fourth blog post, use the resources in Seventeen Moments of Soviet History (1921 and 1924) to examine a significant aspect of the Russian Revolution.  You should also consult the Freeze text (the rest of Chapter 9 and Chapter 10).

You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post. In any case, your post should address some aspect of one the following questions:

How did the Bolsheviks prevail in the Civil War?

How did the Bolsheviks negotiate the transition from being revolutionaries to being rulers?

What role did nationality and religion play in the formation of the Soviet State?

How were politics and economics connected in this period (1917-24)?

1905: Revolution and Constitutional Experiment

Choosing posts for the slider this week was a challenge as there were many excellent options. This week’s submissions covered topics ranging from the career of Sergei Witte and the increasing social tensions that emerged in the wake of the state’s modernization campaign, to Lenin’s ideology, the Russo-Japanese War, Bloody Sunday, Father Gapon,The October Manifesto,…

Third Blogpost Guidelines

It’s time for more war and revolution! This week we move into range of a fabulous digital archive that will inspire us for the rest of the term. The topic of your post this week is the end of the autocracy and the two revolutions of 1917.  Use the resources in Seventeen Moments of Soviet…

Images of Imperial Russia

Welcome to the first weekly digest! We’ve had a few bumps (and the WordPress Widget gods are on strike as I type this), but our first edition is ready to go. The photographs from the Prokudin-Gorskii collection prompted a series of wide-ranging and insightful posts dealing with Imperial Russian society between the Great Reforms and…

Second Blogpost Guidelines – Updated Thursday 9/4

Our second set of blog posts will focus on the development of a revolutionary movement in Russia and the revolution of 1905. You should start by reading Freeze (Chapter 8) and then develop one of the following topics: 1) Marxism / Leninism. Use the resources in the Marxist Internet Archive to examine the development of…