Blogpost Guidelines

Sixth Blogpost Guidelines

Irakli Toidze: (1943) Another in the Toidze series of recruiting posters. Source: Natalia Vorontsova-Iur eva: Live Journal

Irakli Toidze: (1943) Another in the Toidze series of recruiting posters.
Source: Natalia Vorontsova-Iur eva: Live Journal

This week we turn our attention to The Great Patriotic War (aka World War II) and the immediate post-war period.  Please use one of the modules from 1943 or 1947 in Seventeen Moments in Soviet History on-line archive. You may also use the module on Soviet Territorial Annexations from 1939.  You should consult  Ch. 12 in the Freeze text. If you are writing about something specific to the war, it would be worth considering William C. Fuller’s discussion on pp. 383-392 of Freeze about the reasons for Soviet victory. You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post.  There’s plenty of action, drama, and complexity to keep us all engaged this week.  Не шага назад!

Fifth Blogpost Guidelines

Yurii Pimenov: Everybody to the Competition! (1928)

Yurii Pimenov: Everybody to the Competition! (1928)

Welcome back to the Motherblog!  The thirties await our attention and as good Rockin’ Shockworkers, we will bring our best, most enthusiastic and most astute energies to the task at hand. No “False Shockworkers” in our collective!

For this week’s post, please choose a topic from the 1934, 1936 or 1939 section of Seventeen Moments of Soviet History and use it to examine the political, social, economic and cultural dynamics of the Soviet thirties.  (Please save the module on “Territorial Annexations” for next week, as it is directly connected to World War II.) You should also consult second part of Ch. 11 (pp. 358-373) in the Freeze text. You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post.

Fourth Blogpost Guidelines

"Artwork by El Lissitzky 1919". Via Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Artwork_by_El_Lissitzky_1919.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Artwork_by_El_Lissitzky_1919.jpg

Beat the Whites with a Red Wedge “Artwork by El Lissitzky 1919“. Via Wikipedia.

For your fourth blog post, use the resources in Seventeen Moments of Soviet History (1921 and 1924) to examine a significant aspect of the Russian Revolution.  You should also consult the Freeze text (the rest of Chapter 9 and Chapter 10).

You may focus on an event, a development or an individual. Your post should use (and cite) primary sources (texts, music, or images). You may also use a particular image or primary document as a focal point for your post. In any case, your post should address some aspect of one the following questions:

How did the Bolsheviks prevail in the Civil War?

How did the Bolsheviks negotiate the transition from being revolutionaries to being rulers?

What role did nationality and religion play in the formation of the Soviet State?

How were politics and economics connected in this period (1917-24)?

Third Blogpost Guidelines

It’s time for more war and revolution! This week we move into range of a fabulous digital archive that will inspire us for the rest of the term. The topic of your post this week is the end of the autocracy and the two revolutions of 1917.  Use the resources in Seventeen Moments of Soviet…

Second Blogpost Guidelines – Updated Thursday 9/4

Our second set of blog posts will focus on the development of a revolutionary movement in Russia and the revolution of 1905. You should start by reading Freeze (Chapter 8) and then develop one of the following topics: 1) Marxism / Leninism. Use the resources in the Marxist Internet Archive to examine the development of…

First Response to First Responses

Welcome, Comrades! (Some Blogging Advice)

Hello there – my name is Leah, and I am happy to say that I am a part of the Editorial Team for the course this semester.  I took this class in Fall 2013 and also took Soviet Culture in Fall 2012 (wow, that seems like a long time ago), so even though I have […]

Get to know me!

Hi All! My name is Robyn Walters and I am super excited to be a part of the editorial team for the Fall 2014 20th Century Russian History class. I am a senior here at Virginia Tech and am majoring in Political Science with minors in History and Russian Studies. I spent a month in […]

First Blogpost Guidelines

Russian Railway Engine, 1909-1915

Sergei Prokudin-Gorskii, photographer to Tsar Nicholas II, may have had his mobile photo-laboratory in the rail car behind this “Compound” engine. (1909-1915)
Prokudin-Gorskii Collection, LOC

For your first blog post, please select a photograph from this online exhibit at the Library of Congress and analyze it in the context of social and economic change in late Imperial Russia.  A photograph such as this one, for example, might lead you to talk about the state’s industrialization campaign, and the role of prominent statesmen such as Sergei Witte in that endeavor.  You might even want to develop a full-length post about Witte. This photograph might also raise questions about the geo-political implications of extending the railway system across the breadth of a vast empire.  Looking forward to our discussions over the next couple of weeks, you should think about how the combination of economic modernization and the autocracy’s resistance to political change would inform developments leading up to the fall of the Romanov dynasty and the rise of the Bolsheviks in 1917.

Different images in the Prokudin-Gorskii collection will prompt different lines of inquiry, of course. So choose an image that appeals to you and start digging. Some of you may want to learn more about the photographer himself and the history of photography. Or you might want to explore and feature maps in a post about historical geography and Imperial space. The Freeze text is the best place to start learning about your topic, but you may consult and cite any other reliable source as well. Just make sure to link to it or cite it in your post. You should also (always) make sure to properly acknowledge the source of the images you use.

This image is titled: Steam engine “Kompaund” with a Schmidt super-heater.

It was created by: Prokudin-Gorskiĭ, Sergeĭ Mikhaĭlovich, 1863-1944, photographer

The permanent record here: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/prk2000000564/